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Washington Filmworks Presents Town Hall Seattle: Learn to Lobby

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October 28th, 6:00pm

Washington Filmworks hosts this important event with special guests Senator Jeanne Kohl-Welles and government relations specialist Becky Bogard for an evening that promises to inform, enlighten, and ignite involvement with the upcoming election and legislative season.

Tuesday October 28th, 6:00pm at the Northwest Film Forum marks a Town Hall meeting addressing significant legislative matters. With the 2015 legislative season scheduled to open on January 12th, now is the time to get political.

Join us to learn how you can be involved and why grassroots engagement is important. Find out how you can best support your legislator and what stories you should tell about our industry. Washington Filmworks will also give the most up-to-date information about the work of the Advocacy Committee and talk about the organization’s plans for additional funding for the program. Come be a part of this riveting and relevant discussion on how you can influence your elected officials and get your voice heard.

Mark your calendars for Tuesday October 28th to receive incredible insight and information on how to get involved with the upcoming election and legislative season.

For those on the east side of the state eager to get their voice heard – there will be a Town Hall Meeting on Thursday November 6th. Guests are encouraged to stay after for the launch of Pulling Focus Spokane featuring producer Lacey Leavitt.  Tickets for Pulling Focus are now on sale! 

Snohomish – Antique Capital of the Northwest

Washington Filmworks (WF) uses our Location of the Month newsletters to showcase the diversity of unique looks and resources for production in a number of jurisdictions around Washington State. Find previous installments archived on our website and on the WF Blog.


City of Snohomish – October 2014

Photo credit: City of Snohomish

Photo credit: City of Snohomish

Historic Snohomish is listed in both the state and national registers of historic places. Founded in 1859, Snohomish is known as the “Antique Capital of the Northwest” and is a treasure trove of historic buildings and homes. Bound by the Snohomish and Pilchuck Rivers, Snohomish has 37 acres of park land and 61 acres of Blackmans Lake. The gateway to the Centennial Trail, Snohomish follows abandoned rail lines north to Skagit County. Its farm valley has miles of country roads that wind through the lush and scenic farmlands. Harvey Field airport serves fixed wing and rotor-wing aircrafts and is home to world-class skydiving and hot air ballooning.

Snohomish Weather

Photo credit: Larry Bauman

Photo credit: Larry Bauman

Snohomish has temperate weather with dry warm summers and mild winters with light rain precipitation.

Average Temperature:

January – High 47.0 F, Low 34.0 F

July – High 76.0 F, Low 53.0 F

Precipitation:

January Rainfall – 6.24 inches

July Rainfall – 1.33 inches

Source: 

www.weather.com


Projects Filmed in Snohomish

Photo credit: City of Snohomish

Photo credit: City of Snohomish

Commercial

  • T-Mobile

Feature

  • You Can’t Win
  • 7 Minutes
  • Chase
  • Hot Pursuit
  • Past Midnight
  • Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me
  • Twice in a Lifetime
  • Bustin’ Loose

Television

  • My Classic Car Show
  • The Fugitive
  • Northern Exposure

Key Locations of Interest

Photo credit: City of Snohomish

Photo credit: City of Snohomish

Key Locations of Interest
  • Bailey Farms
  • Blackman Lake
  • Centennial Trail
  • Craven Farm
  • G.A.R. Cemetery
  • Hagen Family Farm
  • Harvey Field
  • Historic Business District
  • Historic Homes District
  • Ironworks
  • Pioneer Village
  • Snohomish River Trail
  • Snohomish River Trestle
  • Stocker Farms
  • Thomas Family Farm

Distance to Closest Large Washington Airport

  • Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is 40 miles from Snohomish
  • Paine Field Snohomish County Airport is 15 miles from Snohomish

Distance to Closest Large Cities in Washington

  • Everett is 9 miles from Snohomish
  • Seattle is 30 miles from Snohomish

Relevant Contact Name and Information

  • Local Film Liaison - Debbie Emge, Economic Development Manager, City of Snohomish, ­(360) 282-3197, emge@snohomishwa.gov
  • Agency that issues permits and costs - Katie Hoole, Permit Coordinator, City of Snohomish, (360) 282-3156, hoole@snohomishwa.gov, there is no cost to film, but you may need a Right of Way Permit.
  • Police or Sheriff’s Department or agency that handles traffic control –  City of Snohomish Police, (360) 568-0888

Accommodations

Photo credit: Harvey Field

Photo credit: Harvey Field

A list of accommodations are available online at: http://snohomishwa.gov/321/Places-to-Stay


About:

1411 Fourth Ave., Suite 420
Seattle,WA 98101
(206) 264-0667
Washington Filmworks is the non-profit 501(c)(6) organization that manages the state film and production incentive programs. Its mission is to create economic development opportunities by building and enhancing the competitiveness, profile, and sustainability of Washington’s film industry. We do this by creating possibilities for local and national filmmakers, offering comprehensive production support, as well as financial incentives.

A New Web World for Washington Filmworks…

Washington Filmworks is going to undergo an exciting and long-in-the-works change – we are thrilled to announce that we have revamped and redesigned our website!

Although it’s very chic, the website is much more than boasting some bells & whistles. Washington Filmworks’ new webpage is as fresh, eye-grabbing, and unique as our state film setting yet will have all the information, news, and content we so love to promote and distribute. The site is very user-friendly and markets the gorgeous, dynamic, and opportunity-filled state of Washington. We have several new photos from Seattle, Bellingham, Spokane, and Walla Walla, amongst others; more conveniently placed and presented information for applicants, productions, and those involved with the Innovation Lab; and direct access to our Blog and Newsletter, so that you’re always in-the-know with what we have going on.

Here are a few preview pictures for those of you who want a sneak peak:

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Among the new features on the website, the Washington Filmworks Blog’s latest updates and posts will display directly on the site’s homepage – so that the Washington filmmaking and production news is always on your radar.  In addition, we will soon end blogging from our current WordPress page and start posting entries and articles directly onto our website so that all our events and film news, updates, and interviews are all in one place.

Feeling a bit overwhelmed? Not to worry – while there are many online changes going on with Washington Filmworks, we will slowly ease and welcome our passionate supporters into our home and clearly signal where and when the shifts take place.

Commercialize Seattle Heads to College

New Latest Work

Congratulations to Workhouse Creative, a production company based in Seattle. They are now featured in the Latest Work section of Commercialize Seattle. This business development campaign is designed to drive production and advertising to the region and the Latest Work section of the Commercialize Seattle website showcases some of the very best commercial work coming out of Seattle and Washington State.


Workhouse Creative

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Agency or Production Company: Workhouse Creative
Commercial: College Bound
Company Websitewww.workhousecreative.com

Explain yourself, Workhouse Creative: Workhouse is a nimble company housing some of the most talented directors, production staff, visual artists and post-production specialists out there. We believe in strategy, integrity and results and infuse that mantra into all of our work. We are willing to go the extra mile, take risks, reinvent, inspire and produce only cutting edge, ground breaking and fresh content.


Why Should You Submit New Work?

When we’re out selling the region as one of the best places in the world to make commercials, we point people to the Latest Work section on the Commercialize Seattle website to show them what we can do here! The campaign highlights locally made commercials and is a hub where brands and agencies look to find great talent. Local production companies and ad agencies should register and learn more.

We frequently showcase new work, so get registered and submit. Then we can show you off to the world. Remember, advertising is the best thing any of us can do!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle’s Creative Community Constructs Conversation

Washington Filmworks participates in the Seattle Film Summit and relaunches Pulling Focus.

Lacey Leavitt and Ron Leamon speak on behalf of the WA Film PAC at the Seattle Film Summit.

Lacey Leavitt and Ron Leamon speak on behalf of the WA Film PAC at the Seattle Film Summit.

Washington Filmworks has had a busy week with the Seattle film community. The Northwest Film Forum set the stage for two great events that explored the business of film and the changes occurring within the industry.

The Seattle Film Summit launched the first of the two events. The Seattle Film Summit’s mission is to empower and inspire Washington state media producers, especially filmmakers, to discover and develop innovative methods of storytelling, funding, and distribution.  In its third year the Summit partnered with the Local Sightings Film Festival to bring the community a series of non-nonsense panels about the business of film.

Washington Filmworks Executive Director Amy Lillard participated in a panel on Saturday focusing on film and television production on the west coast, “From LA To Vancouver: Competition or Collaboration.” Joining Aaron Wolf (Filmmaker and CEO Howling Wolf Productions), Daniel Sol (Co-Founder and Co-Director of HollyShorts Film Festival), Rosalie Miller (Filmmaker), and moderator Stefan Hajek (Filmmaker, Wanderhouse Productions), Lillard was able to briefly discuss the production incentive program. She also detailed the Innovation Lab, a program designed to support Washington based filmmakers. Also interesting was the perspective LA filmmaker Wolf had on Washington’s filmmaking community, noticing that it promotes collaboration and positive experiences rather than fierce competition. Wolf effused how exciting and refreshing the filmmaking community is here, and how it espouses support over betrayal. Finally, the panel wrapped discussing whether Washington should promote their filmmakers across the country, or bring new talents into the state.

Following “From LA To Vancouver: Competition or Collaboration,” was a panel dedicated to the efforts of the Washington Film Political Action Committee (PAC). The group advocates for the growing film, television, and commercial industry in Washington and strives to educate the community and legislatures about the industry’s state and needs. WA Film PAC leaders Ron Leamon and Lacey Leavitt, and longtime film advocate James Keblas, were on hand to explain how the group promotes Washington State as a diverse and ideal environment for production and how important it is to have the industry advocated on its own behalf. Senator Jeanne-Kohl-Welles also participated in the conversation to give some Olympia insight and important information on how to approach elected officials about the film industry. WA Film PAC is doing very important work on behalf of the statewide film industry. Check out their website for more information.

Amy Lillard moderates a panel full of marketing expertise.

Amy Lillard moderates a panel full of marketing expertise.

Last night, Washington Filmworks re-launced “Pulling Focus” in Seattle, a series about the business of film with a discussion entitled “The Brave New World of Content and Commercials.” Lillard moderated a panel of advertising personalities – Paul Mattheaus (Chairman and Founder of Digital Kitchen), Lara Johannsen (Creative Manager at Wong Doody), Matt Peterson (CEO of Creature), and Norma Jean Straw (Director of Content Development, B47 Studios). The discussion explored the shifts caused by digital pipelines in the marketing world, and how the traditional model of 15 and 30-second commercials is now deemed antiquated in favor of bold and boundary-breaking content-marketing. Mattheaus noted the challenge today is how to engage audiences with a brand by not interrupting them, as commercials often do. He explains that artists (filmmakers, designers, etc.) are now at work with agencies, trying to create content with relevant meaning to not hook or catch consumers, but create genuine interest. Johannsen agreed, saying that companies hire highly creative individuals to think flexibly for each client and brand, and highlighted the interactivity at play in content-marketing. Citing Starbucks™’s YouTube channel in which several stories were told in several countries, Johannsen argued that branded entertainment models often change based on consumer habits – the more involved and active watchers get, the more interactive and dynamic the content becomes. Straw added to Johannsen’s perspective, saying that a prominent goal that pops up in this new environment is to balance the paying brand’s values with a key, original, and striking ways to reach audiences. Peterson thinks this new system comes down to one word: content. Agreeing with his peers, he sees branded entertainment as an opportunity to move out of the old format and tell deeper and fuller stories, assuring his client and consumers that it’s quality rather than interrupting noise. Altogether, the panelists concluded this new world of content and commercials is full of mutual opportunity – brands learn how to publicize and promote their products in a bold new way, while agencies employ gifted artists to make it happen.

The next of the Pulling Focus series will be in Spokane on Thursday, November 6th, with independent film producer Lacey Leavitt (Laggies, Lucky Them) on how to get your story from page to screen. Preceding the event will be a Town Hall meeting focused on lobbying and supporting elected officials.

Local Sightings at Northwest Film Forum is Back!

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Returning tonight is the Local Sightings Film Festival, hosted every year by the Northwest Film Forum (NWFF) in Seattle’s Capitol Hill. Local Sightings gathers together and showcases new films from talents all over the Northwest (from Alaska to Oregon) for audiences, allowing them to experience the wonder of homegrown and emerging artists. NWFF Program Director Courtney Sheehan has worked hard to produce this year’s festival, which includes a number of screenings from the region’s most distinct artists. In addition, Sheehan has assembled artist talks, performances, networking events, and parties for this year’s festival, as well as the expanded and week-long Seattle Film Summit with panels on topics ranging from filming all across the West Coast to the strategy of the Washington Film Political Action Committee (PAC).

Even with so much excitement and activity going on, Sheehan kindly took the time to sit down with Washington Filmworks and discuss Local Sightings 2014’s lineup, events, and conferences.

Washington Filmworks: Thank you so much for taking the time to chat about Local Sightings 2014. This is the 17th year of Local Sightings – what does that mean for the Northwest Film Forum and the filmmaking community of the Northwest? 

Courtney Sheehan: Seventeen years ago, NWFF was known as Wiggly World –  a group of filmmakers who ran the Grand Illusion and supported local film production in whatever ways they could. The internet had not yet radicalized how people make and watch movies, and films were still shot and shown on film. Ten years ago, 16 of the films in Local Sightings were projected on 16mm film! The program for this year’s festival reflects what has changed and what has stayed the same both for Northwest filmmakers and at NWFF. While very few movies today are shot on film, more movies are being made – this year we’re showing twice as many feature films as we did ten years ago. NWFF remains a hub for community gatherings, but the content of conversation has transformed. This year’s Seattle Film Summit includes topics on the gaming industry, DIY distribution and publicity strategies for the startup era. This is also the first year Local Sightings includes a program and discussion on interactive and multi-platform work. Boundaries between media forms are blurring, opening up new opportunities for filmmakers in other fields – and new ways for organizations like NWFF to support independent film and media makers.

WF: In addition to the screenings, what exciting talks and panels can audiences anticipate this year? 

CS: The opening night puts the emphasis on the people that make up this community by introducing the filmmakers before we screen their films. Attendees will get to hear from director and producer of Bella Vista, the opening film, before it screens the following night. Speakers from the Seattle Film Summit will give a glimpse of what’s in store during their panel discussions. Director, teacher, and choreographer Dayna Hanson will share highlights from the dance film class she’s teaching this season. Then, DJ Sharlese Metcalf from KEXP’s Audioasis will be spinning on the staircase in the lobby, and the new local brewery Outer Planet will make sure everyone’s thirst is slaked.

We are also hosting a free education open house and showcase of student work recently made in classes at NWFF. People can come and talk to instructors about their upcoming classes, and even sign up on the spot. There’s also a fantastic workshop being offered during the festival with Caryn Cline. Students will learn the ‘botanicollage’ technique used by filmmakers like Stan Brakhage, which entails creating handmade film frames using local botanicals – another fun local connection. The final product from that workshop will be screened the next day alongside a program of other experimental work, including Brakhage’s – and multiple films will be shown on 16mm.

Before the closing film and party, folks can gather for a Town Hall discussion hosted by the Seattle Film Industry Caucus. It’s a great opportunity for filmmakers to recap everything that was seen and discussed during the Seattle Film Summit and festival, and to let us know how we can best support their work. Then our last big party is right around the corner at Vermillion. Vermillion owner Diana Adams’s commitment to supporting local artists has truly set the standard on Capitol Hill. Naturally, her spot is one of the last bastions of bonafide cool in the Pike/Pine corridor.

WF: What are the largest benefits of hosting this festival every year – what impact does it have on the film culture of Washington, specifically? 

CS: I recently looked back at the festival lineup from ten years ago and noticed many familiar names: Megan Griffiths, Drew Christie, Lynn Shelton, Web Crowell, Bret Fetzer. As a platform for discovery, Local Sightings actively cultivates new film culture. You can look at the programs from year to year and track the development of new filmmaking voices in the region.

Here’s a story that quite directly illustrates the impacts the role that the fest has on the production of new work in WA state. Two years ago at Local Sightings, Brian Perkins won best short for his film The Heavens. He began developing a feature and when he needed a leading man, former program director Adam Sekuler connected him with Zach Weintraub (Local Sightings was the first festival in the US to screen Weintraub’s films). Together they made a feature that is premiering in Local Sightings this year.

Another example – local filmmaker Zeek Earl was on this year’s Filmmaker Magazine list of 25 New Faces of Independent Film. I met him at a party in his honor, where he told me he used to be a Local Sightings intern! Now we’re the Seattle premiere of his latest short, Prospect.

And it’s about more than discovering individual voices. It’s also about discovering opportunities for connection within and across communities. As the only festival in Seattle dedicated entirely to local and regional film, Local Sightings is the meeting grounds for film artists and professionals to connect with their neighbors – from across I-5, and even across state and national borders. Ideally, a screenwriter learns about a new area of opportunity in the city’s thriving gaming industry. A director-writer-producer-editor at a crossroads gains some insight from hearing Megan Griffiths and Tony Fulgham share their take and experiences with balancing artistic practice with commercial work (an idea that will be explored in-depth on a panel in the Film Summit). An audience member’s heart is moved or her mind is bent or her worldview is broadened. It all starts with coming to the movie theater to discover a new film, a new experience, a new friend.

WF: Are there any exciting Washington-based filmmakers emerging this year? 

CS: Kara Schoonmaker and Anna Conser’s 30-minute Maureen is a pure surrealist magic, with exquisite set design.  Andrew Finnigan’s debut Koinonia creates an effective dystopian atmosphere with a tiny budget – it’s a true accomplishment. High schooler Abbey Sacks is definitely one to watch – her short Connie shows a grace few filmmakers strike upon so young. Zeek Earl and Chris Caldwell are on Filmmaker Magazine’s 25 New Faces of Independent Film and their work has been strongly supported by SXSW. Arts scene fixture Greg Lundgren has made his first film, a one-take feature carried wonderfully by the performance of one non-actor.

WF: Finally, this year’s fest is going on in conjunction with the Seattle Film Summit – what can the filmmaking community expect from combination? 

CS: Each edition of the Seattle Film Summit has been held at NWFF as a partnership during Local Sightings, and this year we have deepened and expanded upon that collaboration. In addition to the main day of the Summit on Saturday the 27th, panels will be hosted throughout the festival. We have an all-star lineup of speakers and we can’t wait to unleash their expertise. We have reached farther into area media companies to bring in professionals from the design, tech, and gaming industries so filmmakers can get an even wider shot glimpse of developments in the creative industries.


We are extremely grateful to Courtney Sheehan for taking the time to share some incredible information and insight into Local Sightings 2014. The festival runs September 25th – October 4th at the Northwest Film Forum, and more information on the 10 day event is available on the festival’s website.


csheehan-199x300About Courtney Sheehan, Northwest Film Forum Program Director: Courtney Sheehan is program director for Northwest Film Forum. She has curated film programs and produced events for theaters and festivals on three continents. On a year-long Watson Fellowship, Courtney investigated the organizational structures, community roles, and programming strategies of twenty film festivals and media centers in India, Spain, the Netherlands, Brazil, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia and Macedonia. As a journalist, Courtney has covered film events ranging from the world’s largest documentary festival (IDFA in Amsterdam) to South America’s largest animation festival (Anima Mundi in Rio de Janeiro) and her publications include Bitch Magazine, Senses of Cinema, The Independent, and NECSUS: European Journal of Media Studies.

Pulling Focus Seattle, October 1st: The Brave New World of Content and Commercials

Paul Matthaeus (Digital Kitchen, Chairman and Founder), Lara Johannsen (Wong Doody, Creative Manager), and Norma Jean Straw (B47 Studios, Director of Content Development) lead the panel and guide us all into this fresh and shifting world.

Wednesday October 1st marks the return of Pulling Focus in Seattle, an exciting and informative series exploring the business of film. This particular event, set to take place during the 17th annual Local Sightings Film Festival at the the Northwest Film Forum, is an insightful look into the changing world of commercial production and their clients.

Panel Description:
We used to take commercials for granted. Fifteen to thirty seconds, pushing a product with minimal dialogue and lots of visuals  it was common, normal, and routine. But here we are, in 2014, and commercials are breaking boundaries. Clients are changing their needs, and so are consumers. Welcome to the world of redesign and branded entertainment, we will help you speak its language. Join us for a panel exploring content-marketing and how businesses are joining up with production companies and agencies to engage consumers through fresh, bold, and sexy ways of storytelling. You’ll hear from fascinating professionals on what client demands entail, why Commercialize Seattle is leading the charge, and how large businesses, local crews, and everyday consumers are affected.

The panel will be moderated by Warren Etheredge, host of “Reel NW” and Editor-At-Large of Media, Inc. 

We encourage guests to continue the conversation after the panel at a cocktail reception hosted on site.

Tickets are available at http://pullingfocus.brownpapertickets.com/

They are $15, or $10 if you are a member of or affiliated with any of the organizations listed below.

This edition of Pulling Focus is hosted by:

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This panel in partnership with:

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It is produced by:

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Mark your calendars for Wednesday, October 1st, to receive first-hand insight and expertise from the industry’s finest on this fascinating new world of content and commercials.

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